Tornadoes rip off roofs in Midwest, flip Coast Guard ship in Florida

By  | 

TAYLORVILLE, Ill. (CBS/AP) - People in Central Illinois assessed the damage Sunday after rare December tornadoes, including one the day before that was a half-mile-wide, ripped roofs off homes, downed power lines and injured at least 20 people.

The severe weather in Illinois was part of a line of thunderstorms that raked areas of the central U.S. late Friday and into Saturday, killing one person in Missouri. The National Weather Service confirmed tornadoes in Illinois, Missouri and Oklahoma.

A tornado also struck a Florida naval base, flipping a Coast Guard ship and injuring at least one person.

Two sailors were thrown from a boat at Kings Bay Naval base but were able to get themselves to safety, CBS affiliate WJAX reports.

At least three tornadoes were confirmed in northwest and southwest Arkansas, which largely caused property and structural damage. No injuries or deaths were reported.

CBS Chicago reports that evidence of the damage was clear on a drive through Taylorville, the area hardest hit. Massive tree limbs were toppled to the ground, roofs were blown off homes and power crews were scrambling to restore service to more than 2,000 customers.

Peak months for tornadoes in much of the Midwest are April and June, according to the weather service. But at least 12 tornadoes were reported in Illinois on Saturday, including one in Taylorville which has been confirmed. If the majority are confirmed, that would be the most tornadoes in Illinois in a December storm since Dec. 18-19, 1957, when there were 21.

The weather service sent crews Sunday to survey the hardest-hit areas in Illinois.

Photographs and video from Taylorville showed several houses flattened, with residents wading into debris to salvage what they could. Some homes remained standing but with gaping holes in the roofs or with no roofs at all.

The tornado was on the ground for around 10 miles before it thundered through Taylorville, and the weather service was able to warn residents of its arrival 41 minutes before it actually struck, Chris Miller, a meteorologist at the service's Lincoln office, said in a phone interview Sunday. That advanced warning gave people critical time to take cover and may have saved lives.

CBS Chicago reports Gov. Brucer Rauner toured storm-ravaged areas Sunday. They include Carlinville, where several buildings were blown to pieces.

"Power lines are down," Rauner said. "Just for safety, stay away from power lines. Stay away from debris as much as possible."

Food pantries are now collecting supplies for those impacted. Many people volunteering are neighbors who have come out to help friends in need.

"To see so many folks that I've grown up with in this community come together and help each other is just an amazing feat," U.S. Rep. Rodney Davis said. "It all goes out to the folks right here in our community."

Assistant Fire Chief Andy Goodall, speaking to reporters Saturday night shortly after the storm pounded the city of 11,000, said at least 100 homes had major damage, including his own, Springfield's State Journal-Register reported.

A Taylorville Memorial Hospital spokesman said 21 people, from age 9 to 97, arrived for treatment Saturday. Most were released within hours. Miller said three people remained hospitalized as of Sunday afternoon.

Miller said preliminary estimates are that the Taylorville tornado may have been an EF2, which indicates wind speeds as high as 135 mph. It could take several more days to know for sure.

The weather service said Sunday that a strong tornado that developed from severe thunderstorms Friday night touched down in Van Buren, Arkansas. It was rated an EF2. About 10 minutes later, a second weaker tornado was confirmed less than 10 miles away near the town of Rudy, Arkansas.

Damage surveys for the two tornadoes are ongoing but officials said dozens of homes were damaged.

Early Saturday morning, a third tornado with estimated peak winds of 107 mph traveled about 8.5 miles through Spring Hill in southwest Arkansas. Its path was intermittent and mostly caused damage to trees and to some structures.



 
Comments are posted from viewers like you and do not always reflect the views of this station. powered by Disqus