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What you need to know about overdoses and 'pressed pills'

(WYMT)
Published: Jun. 4, 2020 at 10:45 AM EDT
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Update 5:30 p.m.

There is a drug in Eastern Kentucky that is becoming a problem.

"We're starting to see more overdoses, our partnerships with law enforcement and our local officials, you know, we work with them closely and track what's going on," said Kentucky River District Health Department Public Health Director, Scott Lockard.

Pressed pills look like normal pills such as Xanax.

"Typically what they use is fentanyl or some other substance and press a pill that looks very similar to suboxone or lower tabs or something of that nature," said Lockard.

Health officials tell him these pills are made in other countries and imported in.

"Different locations but the trafficking pipeline is making its way to Eastern Kentucky," added Lockard.

Those who use pharmacy grade pills do not know the dangers of these drugs.

"When they use one of these counterfeit pills they do the same thing they get a much higher level of an opioid in their system causes them to overdose," said Lockard.

For those addicted to pills, Operation Unite says there is help.

"Reminding them that they are loved working hard to reduce the stigma of addiction encouraging them to use effective coping strategies," said Operation Unite President and CEO, Nancy Hale.

Encouraging local partners and agencies to carry Narcan to help save a life.

"Reminding them that they are loved working hard to reduce the stigma of addiction encouraging them to use effective coping strategies," said Lockard.

You can call the Operation Unite treatment line at 1-866-9-0-UNITE.

For more information on how to get help

Original Story

Officials with the Kentucky River District Health Department posted an alert on Facebook Thursday morning that reports of drug overdoses continue to climb.

In the post, they say in addition to those being reported across the state involving "pressed pills" designed to look like prescription pain killers Xanax and Percocet, our area is seeing an increase of meth and heroin laced with carfentanil.

Officials are urging people to stay vigilant and, if possible, to have access to Naloxone kits, which are available for free at all local health departments.

If you need help with treatment to beat drug addiction, contact

.