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Bowling Green woman finds hope through the homecoming of Navy Seaman Howard Scott Magers

Suzanne Ogawa continues to await for the day, when her family can officially lay her father to...
Suzanne Ogawa continues to await for the day, when her family can officially lay her father to rest.(Ana Medina)
Updated: May. 28, 2021 at 4:44 AM EDT
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BOWLING GREEN, Ky. (WBKO) - The public is invited to attend the memorial service of Navy Seaman Howard Scott Magers on Saturday, May 29th.

The entire journey has brought hope to a Bowling Green woman, whose father has been missing in action for decades.

Suzanne Ogawa continues to await for the day, when her family can officially lay her father to rest.

“My father is Commander Michael George Hoff, he was a fighter pilot in the U.S. Navy and and he was shot down over Laos, during the Vietnam War, January 7, 1970,” says Ogawa.

Ogawa says attending the service on Saturday, “it just gives me a sense of hope that one day, we’ll be able to bury my father on American soil. When he left in September of 69, he left behind my mother and there were five of us children, I was just over two when he left. So I have no memories of him.”

When her father went missing in action, her mother became very involved in attempting to try to find answers not just for herself but for other military wives, and became inspired.

“She read an article in a newspaper and basically came up with the idea she contacted a flag company, and the POW MIA, which is really the only other national flag we have. She was behind the, she had the idea for that and was behind the creation of that flag. So it’s very important and very meaningful to our family specifically. It went in small production in 1971. She did present it to the National League of Families, and they formally adopted it as their flag in 1972, early 1972, and it’s actually now through Congress passing laws, it’s actually a nationally recognized for all of our conflicts,” says Ogawa.

In the midst of searching for answers, Ogawa never forgets, “there’s just under 80,000 still missing and unaccounted for. So we’re just one one of those 82,000 I hope it also serves as a reminder for our current military that we will make sure that they are never left behind and never forgotten as well. Especially this weekend being what it is, is while you’re enjoying poolside, enjoying being with friends and family to take a moment and remember those that have given the ultimate sacrifice for our country, and maybe ask yourself, How can I serve others? We are in this together and we’re gonna keep fighting.”

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